The nice thing about being a small independent business using a local printer is that we can take on board your feedback and apply it every time we do a print run. We’ve been writing down all your suggestions over the last year following the launch of our book Hai!ku and the number one request was to add in the stroke order for each Kanji. So I’m happy to say the second edition print will include stroke order, along with a few minor tweaks and additions like an index to search for the Kanji you want to study.

Get your free printout

I didn’t want anyone to feel left out, especially those who supported the project in its early stage. So as a small thank you, I’ve compiled all the stroke orders together into a free PDF printout which you can download here:

What Is Stroke Order Anyway?

Every kanji is made up of individual strokes which are drawn in a set sequence with specific directions for the brush/pen to follow. Learning this does help with the flow when writing and creates a stronger memory of each character and their meaning. However, unless you want to study caligraphy you won‘t be judged on how you write each kanji in the real world (or the JLPT test for that matter). Learning it can just feel like another thing on an already high pile to study. Plus in the modern day, you are more likely to be reading and typing Kanji than physically writing it.

Because of this, I was hesitant to add this the first time around, as the book’s focus was to be an entry-level introduction to Kanji with more on visualising and memorising the Kanji meaning. I was concerned it would visually clutter the book and overwhelm beginners with information that could put them off wanting to pursue further. Ultimately it is up to you if you want to learn the correct stroke order or not. I tried to implement it in a way that would look more approachable and fit with the style of a Hai! product, so I hope you are happy with the addition.


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